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Newspapers in Education

Newspapers
in
Education

Louisiana Reading Association
2007-2008

Co-Chairpersons:
Kathy S. O’Neal & Judy Broussard

Committee Members:
Lisa Patterson
Amy Hiers
Evelyn Huckaby


Newspapers in Education Directory
Louisiana Reading Association
www.lareading.org
International Reading Association
www.reading.org

2007-2008

NIE Chairperson             NIE Contest Coordinator
Kathy O’Neal Lisa Patterson
West Carroll Parish The News-Star
Oak Grove Elementary School 411 North 4th St.
206 Tiger Drive Monroe, LA 71201
Oak Grove, LA 71263 318-362-0275 (W)
318-428-8953 (H) & (Fax) 318-362-0349 (F)
318-669-1793 (Cell) lpatterson@monroe.gannett.com
mrsoneal@yahoo.com  

Exemplary NIE Teacher Coordinator NIE Week Coordinator _
Judy Broussard Amy Hiers
The Daily Advertiser The Times
1100 Bertrand Drive PO Box 30222
Lafayette, LA 70506-4110 Shreveport, LA 71130-0222
337-289-6492 (W) 318-459-3474 (W)
337-289-6459 (Fax) 318-459-3231 (Fax)
jbroussa@smgpo.gannett.com ahiers@shrevepo.gannett.com

NIE Curriculum Coordinator IRA Committee Chairperson
Evelyn Huckaby Jim Abbot
NIE Coordinator Newspaper Association of America
The Advocate www.naa.org
7290 Bluebonnet Boulevard 703-902-1730
P.O. Box 588
Baton Rouge, LA 70821
225-388-0228 (W)
225-388-0746 (Fax)
ehuckaby@theadvocate.com









Newspapers in Education Goals
Louisiana Reading Association
2007-2008

1. Develop and implement NIE curriculum for classroom use- Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, Geography, Family Involvement.

2. Develop and promote NIE content for students in Grades K-12.

3. Recognize an Exemplary NIE Teacher in the state that uses the newspaper to teach and promote literacy in the classroom.

4. Promote NIE Week (last full week of March) and disseminate the necessary information to Local Councils by September for a successful campaign.

5. Develop and disseminate information concerning NIE Contest through local councils. Determine guidelines and timelines. Collect, judge, and report contest results in the designated categories. Publicize winning entries in major state and local newspapers.

6. Contact major, state, and local newspapers for activities and/or support of the LRA Newspaper in Education.

Newspapers in Education Activities
Louisiana Reading Association
www.lareading.org

Use Newspapers in the Classroom

· To enhance thematic units (pets, space travel, inventions, heroes)
· To encourage comprehension and higher thinking (developing literature or content area newspapers, separating fact from opinion)
· To develop comparison and contrast (using stories about the same topic from different newspapers, looking at a story and editorial on the same topic)
· To provide material for sustained silent reading or cooperative groups
· To build vocabulary concepts (finding words with common origins, paraphrasing headlines or comics)
· To teach basic reading skills (left to right sequence, classification, letter and word recognition)
· To link literature and other curriculum to the news
· To reinforce geography concepts (plotting story location on maps)
· To apply mathematical concepts (shopping using classified or display ads; graphing temperatures or sports statistics; drawing diagrams from given dimensions; reducing or increasing recipes)
· To promote speaking skills (interviewing people in the news, comic strips, characters, advice columnists; reading a story)
· To offer models of different writing styles (news feature, editorial)



Newspapers in Education Activities
Louisiana Reading Association
www.lareading.org

Newspapers in Education Curriculum
Newspapers are important and useful tools for nurturing readers and writers at all levels. Newspapers provide functional connections to curriculum and a wealth of relevant reading. Students who read newspapers regularly become familiar with the wide range of writing models that form the basis for written communication in a democratic society. In short, newspapers extend students’ understanding and literacy beyond their classrooms. Contact the NIE person at a local newspaper or the publisher. Most newspapers offer teacher guides and student rates. NIE workshops  available. Contact: Evelyn Huckaby, The Advocate, P.O. Box 588, Baton Rouge, LA (225) 388-0228

Exemplary NIE Teacher Award
Complete the form with teacher’s name, school, and parish and provide documentation. Must include the teacher’s local reading council, LRA, and IRA membership numbers for 2 consecutive years. Include a description of the program utilized by the teacher that uses the newspaper to foster good reading habits. Include documentation with pictures, news articles, and/or students’ work. Must be postmarked by April 15th to a local reading council. The local council must postmark the form to LRA by April 30th. NIE Workshops available. Contact:  Judy Broussard, Literacy Coordinator, Partners in Literacy Project, The Daily Advertiser, 1100Bertrand Dr. Lafayette, LA 70506-4110.
                                               JBroussa@smgpo.gannett.com (337-289-6492)  (337-289-6459)

Newspapers in Education Week
(Last Full Week in March) The International Reading Association, Newspaper Association of America, and the National Council of Social Studies cosponsor NIE Week. For materials contact IRA 1-800-336-READ or NAA 1-703-902-1700. Use newspapers in learning activities and submit documentation to local reading councils and/or local newspapers. NIE guides available at www.reading.org or www.naa.org.  NIE workshops available.
Contact: Amy Hiers, The Times, PO Box 30222, Shreveport, LA 71130-0222
ahiers@shrevepogannett.com  (318-459-3474)

NIE Contest Guidelines
**All local council entries (by April 15th) and state entries postmarked on/or before April 30th.
SEND TO: Lisa Patterson, The News-Star, 411 North 4th St., Monroe, 71201. lpatterson@monroe.gannett.com (318-362-0275)
1. Each participating council and/or special interest must submit the name of one contact person that is a member of IRA, LRA, and a local reading council. The member’s numbers must be included on the form. Entries will only be accepted from local councils, not individual schools, etc.
2. The local council is responsible for the following:
a. Disseminate contest rules to local schools.
b. Judge contest at local level.
c. Submit council’s winner in each category for state competition.
d. Promote the use of newspaper as a teaching tool prior to NIE week and during the year.
3. The NIE Contest is open to students in grades Pre-Kindergarten to 12th grade. All
NIE Contest activities may be on going throughout the school year. 
4. Only 1st place winners in each category should be submitted for the state competition.
5. The NIE entry form must be completed and accompany each entry (one form per entry).
6. All state winners will be awarded trophies and medals. All state participants will be given ribbons. State winners will be announced and presented at the LRA Leadership Awards in July to the local council’s delegate.


Newspapers in Education Contest
Louisiana Reading Association
www.lareading.org
K-4th grades (page 1)
All entries must be submitted to a local reading council postmarked by April 15th. The local council postmarks to LRA by April 30th.
Local Council Name:______________________________Council’s #: ________
Council’s NIE Chairperson Person:________________LRA #:______IRA#______
NIE Contest School Coordinator:____________________________

*All entries must be the student’s original copy. Keep a copy for your records.

Grade:  Pre-K – Kindergarten Alphabet Picture Book
Scrapbook should not exceed 10 ½ X 13 12 in size. All work should come from the newspaper.
Using pictures from the newspaper, match each letter of the alphabet.
Illustrate each letter of the alphabet using one picture from the newspaper (only).
Judging: originality, creativity

Grade: 1 Alphabet Word Scrapbook
  Scrapbook should not exceed 10 ½ X 13 ½ in size.
Using words cut from the newspaper, match each word to a letter of the alphabet.
Illustrate each letter of the alphabet using words and pictures from the newspaper (only).
On each page, write a sentence using one of the words. Underline the word used.
Age appropriate spelling will be considered.
Judging: originality, creativity

Grade: 2 My Favorite Meal
Use grocery store advertisements from the newspaper to illustrate your favorite meal.
Write a paragraph explaining what the meal is and why it is your favorite.

Judging: Originality, creativity, neatness, spelling, grammar, and sentence structure will be considered.

Grade: 3 News Article: What’s going on in my 3rd grade classroom?
Minimum of 100 words/Maximum 200 words.
Words must be counted and number placed in upper right hand corner of paper.
Article must be neatly written.
Spelling and grammar will be considered.

Judging: Originality, creativity, neatness, spelling, grammar,.

Grade: 4 Advertise a Product
Find out cost of advertising in local paper.
Figure cost. List on a separate sheet of paper. Attach to essay.
Ad must include an essay of not more than 150 words on why student chose this product.

Judging: Originality, creativity, neatness, spelling, grammar, and sentence structure will be considered




Newspapers in Education Contest
Louisiana Reading Association
www.lareading.org
5th-12th grades (page 2)
All entries must be submitted to Local Council postmarked by April 15th. Local Council postmarks to LRA by April 30th.
Local Council Name:______________________________Council’s #: ________
Council’s NIE Chairperson Person:________________LRA #:______IRA#______
NIE Contest School Coordinator:____________________________

*All entries must be the student’s original. Keep a copy for your records. Thank you!

Grade: 5 Design a Political Cartoon Strip
Comic strip must have a minimum of 4 frames, a creative title, and a clear message.
Comic strip must be submitted on a sheet of 8 ½ X 11 sheet of paper.
Comic strip must focus on a current event: world and/or state

Judging: Originality, creativity, neatness, spelling, grammar, varied dialect accepted.

Grade: 6 Research and Write
Write a news article on a current event.
Minimum: 200 words  Maximum: 400 words
Place the number of words in the upper right hand corner of paper.

Judging: Interest of story, originality, newspaper format, neatness, sentence structure, spelling, grammar.


Grade: 7 Special Interest Reporter for  a Day
Student must write a special interest story based on an interview.
The story must be typed in newspaper format.
The story must not exceed 750 words with a minimum of 600.
Indicate the number of words in the upper right hand corner of the story.

Judging: Interest of story, originality, newspaper format expectations, story considered for publication, spelling and grammar.

Grade: 8 Special Interest Reporter for  a Day
Student must write a special interest story based on an interview.
The story must be typed in newspaper format.
The story must not exceed 750 words with a minimum of 600.
Indicate the number of words in the upper right hand corner of the story.

Judging: Interest of story, newspaper format, story considered for publication, spelling and grammar.

Grades: 9-12 Opinions on Relevant Events
Students must write a letter stating their opinion on a relevant event in their local area, national, or international concern that they have read about in the newspaper.

Judging: Interest of letter, newspaper format, story considered for publication, spelling, and grammar.


Newspapers in Education
Contest Entry Form
Louisiana Reading Association
www.lareading.org

Local Council Name: ____________________________
Contact Person: ____________________Phone: ________________
Local Council #____________LRA #___________ IRA #___________
Parish/District: __________________________

Each school system and/or Special Interest may only submit one winner per grade level to a local reading council postmarked by April 15th.
 
The local council (only council entries-individual schools will not be accepted) entries are due to LRA postmarked by April 30th.
Mail to: NIE Contest, Lisa Patterson, The News-Star, 411 North 4th St., Monroe, LA 71201
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
TO TEACHERS:
*All entries must be the student’s original work.
Place entry as the first page and then staple this as last page.
Keep a copy for your records. Thank you!

Turn in to NIE School Coordinator by: _____________
*School NIE Contest Coordinator’s Signature:________________

Grade Level: _____ Category Heading :____________________

Student’s Name Printed: _______________________________
*Student’s Signature: _______________________
*Parent’s Signature: ________________________ Date: _______

*Teacher’s Name: _________________________Date: ________
School: ________________________ Phone: _______________
Address: ______________________
                ______________________
*Principal’s Signature: ____________________Date: __________

Newspapers in Education
Exemplary NIE Teacher Award Form
Louisiana Reading Association
www.lareading.org

Exemplary NIE Teacher Award
Complete this form with teacher’s name, school, and parish and provide documentation. Must include the teacher’s local reading council, LRA, and IRA membership numbers for 2 consecutive years. Include a description of the program utilized by the teacher that uses the newspaper to foster good reading habits. Include documentation with pictures, news articles, and/or students’ work. Must be postmarked by April 15th to a local reading council. The local council must postmark the form to LRA by April 30th.   For excellent activities see: Use Newspapers in the Classroom, NIE Week Activities, or other available information on www.lareading.org website on NIE web page or www.reading.org or www.naa.org.
Contact: Judy H. Broussard, Literacy Coordinator, Partners in Literacy Project, The Daily Advertiser/Daily World, 1100 Bertrand Dr., Lafayette, LA 70506-4110    (337)289-6492   Fax: (337) 289-6459 JBroussa@smgpo.gannett.com
Teacher’s Name: ______________________________________________
School:______________________________________________________
Parish/District: _______________________________________________
Local Reading Council Name:_____________________________________  Council #:____________________
Louisiana Reading Association #:__________________________________
International Reading Association #: _______________________________
Council’s Membership Director or President’s signature for verification of 2 consecutive years of membership: __________________________________________Title:__________________

Description of the program utilized by the teacher that uses the newspaper to foster good reading habits. Attach documentation with pictures, news articles, and/or students’ work.













Newspapers in Education Week Activities
Louisiana Reading Association
www.lareading.org

Last full week in March
· Introduce the newspaper to students by identifying the different parts and sections of the paper. Conduct a newspaper scavenger hunt. Give students a list of specific or generic items found in the newspaper and allow students a set amount of time to find them. (Examples of items to find: a movie you would like to see, an apartment for rent, a score for a professional sports team, and a letter to the editor about a local issue.)
·
· Go through the newspaper lingo terms with students. (Attached) Holding one page of the paper up for students to see, go through the room with each student identifying a different term.
·
· After students are familiar with the components of the newspaper, separate classes into groups. Each group will compose a section for a class newspaper. Group members must decide on topics and layout, plus designate a section editor and copy editor.
·
· Each day, have a different scavenger hunt for students. Monday – Newspaper components, Tuesday – Math (percents, fractions, etc.), Wednesday – Language Arts (synonyms, parts of speech), Thursday – Science (weather, health, etc.), Friday – Writing (opinion, persuasive, etc.)
·
· Create a current events bulleting board display featuring newspaper stories and pictures that will keep students informed and up-to-date. The display can be geared to the news and information that is relevant to students or current events in general.
·
· Discuss with your students the skills needed to be a good student. Turn to the classified section of the Daily News. Browse the Help Wanted ads for a job each student might enjoy. What skills are necessary for the job? Are any of the skills the same as those required for a good student? What can students do to help prepare them for the job they selected?



Newspapers in Education Week Activities
Louisiana Reading Association
www.lareading.org

Last full week in March

Language Arts
   Comic Headlines – Use index to find comics. What happened just before, what happened after, write out the dialogue, how many three and four syllable words can you find?
· 5 W’s – Find and write one-sentence summary
· Locate synonyms (Ex. Find synonym for “said”
· Action words in the Sports section to teach verbs
· Practice reading strips aloud to read with good _expression.
· Cut apart and sequence comics again.
· Rewrite classified ad in full sentences.
· Cut out picture without the attached copy. Students write a headline that they think explains the picture. Students can also write an article that could be associated with picture.
· Students read 10 comics. Choose 5 to write the main idea for. Students read aloud the main idea and other students choose which comic is associated with that idea.
Math/Science
· House for sale ads. Compare prices.
o They are categorized by price so students can compare the attributes.
· Car ads, rounding off, estimating, least to most expensive…
· Write a math problem using information from an article.
· Graphing information from the weather map.
· Find a job with hourly rate. Compute a year’s pay.
· Sports statistics (mean, median, mode)
· Plan a healthy meal. Use grocery ads to set budget.
Social Studies
· Team current events game: Take five minutes to skim the front section of the paper. Divide into two teams. Each team will have an opportunity to call out a name or a place in today’s news. The other team gets 10 seconds to identify why that person or place is in the news.
· Rank the most important stories of the day.
· Locate 10 items in the newspaper (photos, ads, articles) that could be put in a time capsule to be opened in 10 years.
· Create a political cartoon using comic character and situation from today’s front page.
Newspapers in Education Curriculum
Louisiana Reading Association
www.lareading.org

Newspapers are important and useful tools for nurturing readers and writers at all levels. Newspapers provide functional connections to curriculum and a wealth of relevant reading. Students who read newspapers regularly become familiar with the wide range of writing models that form the basis for written communication in a democratic society. In short, newspapers extend students’ understanding and literacy beyond their classrooms.
Contact a local newspaper and ask for the Newspapers in Education Coordinator. If there is no NIE coordinator, ask to talk to the publisher. The newspaper representatives will tell you how they can help. Most newspapers offer teacher guides and student rates for classroom sets of newspapers ordered for two or more days or on a weekly basis.
Explore ways to fund newspaper purchases. Check school funds, parent teacher organizations, civics groups, businesses, and local reading councils.
Join IRA and a local reading council. As a member of those organizations, you will receive information on using newspapers in the classroom.
For more information about newspapers, educational services, and materials, call NAA 1-703-902-1700 or IRA 1-800-336-READ:
Available Curriculum Guides: NIE Week: A Good Read; Press Ahead! Creating a Classroom Newspaper; News You Can Use to Teach!; Newspapers Touching the Kaleidoscope of Your Mind; Mastering the Message; Messages and Meanings; Challenges and Choices
Books: Using the Newspaper to Teach ESL Learners; Teaching Reading Skills through the Newspaper
www.reading.org
NIE workshops across Louisiana are available.
Contact: Evelyn Huckaby, The Advocate, P.O. Box 588, Baton Rouge, LA 70821
                                  

Newspapers in Education Curriculum
· Enables students to use newspapers
· Encourages students to learn from print beyond that in books
· Promotes learning experiences that use reading and writing
· Provides material for content area study
· Supplies models of expository, persuasive, and narrative writing
· Offers ideas for storytelling and other oral language
· Connects students with the outside world
· Offers teachers ways to integrate newspapers, regardless of subject, theme, or unit
Newspapers in Education
Louisiana Reading Association
www.lareading.org
Newspaper Terms
Ad - Abbreviation for advertisement
AP - Abbreviation for Associated Press, a wire service (see Wire Service)
Assignment - A story a reporter is covering
Beat - A particular subject, such as the fire or police department
Byline - Name of the article (story) writer/author
Canadian Press - Canadian wire service (see Wire Service)
Caption - Explanation under a photograph, also called a cutline
Circulation - Number of newspaper copies sold
Column - Vertical sections of typed lines on a newspaper page. Also an article that appears regularly in the newspaper (eg. Sports Column)
Copy - Any kind of written material
Correspondent - Reporter stationed in another location
Cut - Newspaper photograph
Cutline - Explanation under a photograph. Also called a caption
Dateline - Where a story happened
Deadline - Time at which all copy for the edition must be submitted
Dummy - A diagram or layout of a newspaper page, showing the placement of stories, headlines, pictures, and advertisements
Editorial - Article expressing the opinion of an editor
Feature - A story in which the interest lies in some factor other than news value
Newspapers in Education
Louisiana Reading Association
www.lareading.org

Newspaper Terms (continued)
Five Ws - Who, What, Where, When, and Why (sometimes "H" for How is added) - the main questions a reporter asks when following up and writing a story
Inverted Pyramid - The style traditionally used in news stories. The lead contains the most important facts (who, what, when, where, why and how) in the story, with the other details arranged in descending order
Jumpline - Line at the bottom of a story listing the page where the story continues
Lead - First paragraph of a news story containing the most important facts, written to catch the reader's attention
Libel - Any words, pictures, or cartoons that, without just cause or excuse, expose someone to public disgrace or ill opinion
Logo - Name of newspaper, as it is printed on the front page
Managing Editor - The editor who directs the daily gathering and editing of the news
Masthead - List of the major executives of the paper, usually printed on the editorial page
Publisher - The chief executive and often owner of a newspaper
Scoop - A scoop occurs when a newspaper, radio station, or TV station gets a news story that no one else has.
Syndicated Features - Material such as comics, advice columns, etc. supplied national to newspapers by news syndicates.
UPI - abbreviation for United Press International, a wire service (see Wire Service)
Wire Service - Network of reporters and editors who write stories for newspapers; these stories are available electronically to all the subscribing newspapers. Also referred to as News Service.


Newspapers in Education
Louisiana Reading Association
www.lareading.org

Dear Council Leaders,

Congratulations on becoming a council leader. This identifies you as an advocate for the quality professional development available through the many services of the Louisiana Reading Association and International Reading Association.

The enclosed materials will assist you in managing the Newspapers in Education programs and activities. Please review the contents carefully, then distribute and discuss the components with the appropriate individuals in the council. The NIE Committee has included the items in this leader’s packet to better accommodate you and your members in meeting deadlines for some of the programs outlined. Local council entry postmarked by April 15th and state entries submitted by April 30th.

**Be sure to fill out your name as the NIE Contact Person prior to sending copies of the packet to others. Your name or someone from your council, the council number, LRA number, and IRA number is required for others in your council to participate in the Exemplary NIE Teacher Award and the NIE Contest. This is a requirement that was determined at the LRA Leadership Training in July 2005. Only council entries will be judged. Individual entries from schools will not be accepted. All entries must follow these guidelines to qualify for judging.

You have online access to selected materials in the Council Leader’s Packet. Go to the Association Web site (www.reading.org); on the left side under Our Programs, select “Councils and Affiliates”; then select “Council Leaders Area” on right side of page; and type in the generic user name and password that is the same for everyone. The identifying information that follows may be used by all leaders:
User Name: council
Password: leader
You will find a wealth of information for you and your council, including downloadable forms. The packet you have received is available for downloading at the Louisiana Reading Association’s web site: www.lareading.org under Newspapers in Education.

Thank you for promoting literacy through Newspapers in Education. Best wishes for a successful and rewarding council year. Please feel free to contact any of the committee members for help during the year.

Sincerely,
Kathy S. O’Neal and Judy Broussard
NIE Committee Chairpersons
Louisiana Reading Association



Last Updated 4/17/09 9:53 pm by Site Administrator

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