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Research in Reading


Position Papers- See excellent articles (Use EBSCO host from www.ulm.edu/library)
“A Learner-Centered Curriculum Based on Award-Winning Literature” by Ouzts,  in  Education; Fall 2003,
vol.124 issue1 pg 76, 10 p
“Drama Activities That Promote and Extend Your Students’ Vocabulary Proficiency” by Alber, in Intervention in School & Clinic; Sep2003, vol. 39 issue 1 p22, 8;  1 bw
“Relationship Between Professional Development, Teachers’ Instructional Practices, and the Achievement of Students in Science and Mathematics” by Huffman, School Science & Mathematics, 00366803, Dec 2003, vol. 103, issue 8, 12p

I.
Classroom Practices Promoting Engagement and Achievement in Comprehension
Keynote Presentation at Reading Research 2004
John T. Guthrie, University of Maryland
Reno, Nevada, USA
May 1, 2004
What role do engagement and motivation have in reading comprehension and comprehension instruction? How can teachers be supported in fostering student engagement and motivation? What does the research say?

In the keynote presentation from Reading Research 2004, John T. Guthrie explores these questions. His presentation makes the following points, outlining their implications for research and teaching:

Engagement has a shared meaning.
Engagement and comprehension are synergistic.
The research base in comprehension is incomplete.
Classroom practices can promote (or prevent) reading engagement.
Experimental (and other) evidence verifies classroom effects.
CORI (Concept Oriented Reading Instruction), a collaborative university-school project focused on integrated reading instruction at the elementary level, is highlighted. More about this work is available in Motivating Reading Comprehension (J.T. Guthrie, A. Wigfield, & K.C. Perencevich, Eds.; Erlbaum, 2004). The CORI video shown during the keynote presentation is also available at the University of Maryland website.

The presentation is 59 minutes long.

See www.reading.org for the following:

View video of the presentation (15 MB, requires RealPlayer)
   
Listen to audio-only version of the presentation (7 MB, requires RealPlayer)
   
  Download accompanying slide show (600 KB PowerPoint file)


II.
Strategies for Addressing Comprehension Difficulties
Presentation at Reading Research 2004
Nell K. Duke, Michigan State University
Reno, Nevada, USA
May 1, 2004
There are numerous reasons that learners may experience difficulty with reading comprehension. In her presentation in the conference strand on comprehension, Nell K. Duke outlines some of the potential causes and highlights research in each area. She then goes on to describe instructional strategies that may prevent or address comprehension difficulties, providing both the research base for each and suggestions for implementation.


This presentation is based in part on the chapter:


Duke, N. K., Pressley, M., & Hilden, K. (2004). Difficulties with reading comprehension. In C. A. Stone, E. R. Silliman, B. J. Ehren, & K. Apel (Eds.), Handbook of language and literacy development and disorders (pp. 501-520). New York: Guilford.

The presentation is 58 minutes long.

For more information see www.reading.org:

View video of the presentation (14 MB, requires RealPlayer)
 
Listen to audio-only version of the presentation (6.69 MB, requires RealPlayer)
   
  Download accompanying slide show (190 KB PowerPoint file)


III.
Learning How to Capture High-Quality Reading Instruction in Diverse Settings
Presentation at Reading Research 2004
Linda Valli and Marilyn Chambliss, University of Maryland
Reno, Nevada, USA
May 1, 2004
This presentation within the conference “Cutting Edge Projects” strand describe how high-quality teaching can be characterized and identified. Drawing on their experience in the ongoing High Quality Teaching in Mathematics and Reading project, presenters Linda Valli and Marilyn Chambliss outline research questions, site selection, instruments, and data collection. Their study, based in fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms among students struggling with reading and math, explores how successful teachers affect student learning and respond to challenges on the pedagogical, organizational, administrative, and policy levels.

The complete presentation is 54 minutes long.

For more information see www.reading.org:

View video of the presentation (all files require RealPlayer):
Complete presentation, Linda Valli and Marilyn Chambliss (13.5 MB)
Linda Valli’s presentation (4.5 MB)
Marilyn Chambliss’ presentation (8.6 MB)

 
Listen to full-length audio-only version of the presentation (6.5 MB, requires RealPlayer)
   
  Download accompanying handout (170 KB PDF file)




 


 


 



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